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December 16. 2002 6:30AM
AFI honors "Gangs of New York," "Chicago" among 2002's best films


The Associated Press

he American Film Institute honored Martin Scorsese's highly anticipated saga "Gangs of New York" and Peter Jackson's latest installment "Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers" as part of its list of the 10 best movies of 2002.

Assembled in alphabetical order and released Monday, the AFI list included a summary of why each film was recognized.

The list included a number of movies that have yet to be widely released, including the dark comedy "About Schmidt," starring Jack Nicholson, and "The Hours," which stars Meryl Streep, Julianne Moore and Nicole Kidman.

The AFI also honored the Hugh Grant comedy "About a Boy" and the big-screen musical "Chicago," starring Renee Zellweger, Catherine Zeta-Jones and Richard Gere.

The institute decided to forgo an award ceremony and issue its list of the Top 10 movies after a disappointing broadcast last year which garnered low ratings and attracted few celebrities.

The AFI also honored the Top 10 television shows, which included longtime programs "The Simpsons" and "Everybody Loves Raymond" and HBO's critically acclaimed series "The Sopranos" and "Six Feet Under."

Selections were made by two 13-member committees - one each for movies and television - which included AFI trustees, industry professionals, film and TV scholars, and critics.

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